What is it?

I've been collecting unusual objects for quite a while, and several years ago I started posting them on this site as puzzles for visitors to figure out what they are. Most of the items are mine but a few belong to others, if you aren't interested in tools there are plenty of other type objects that have also been posted.

For first time visitors I recommend this archive for a wide variety of some of my best pieces.

Tuesday, September 28, 2004

136. 4 3/4" wide





137.


















138. 7" long



139. 2 7/8" tall





140. 5" long





141. 3 3/8" long





Answers

12 Comments:

  • Rear sight for a military rifle. Post it over on Rec Guns and someone will tell you which one.

    gfretwell@aol.com

    By Anonymous Anonymous, at 9/28/2004 8:38 PM  

  • 136 - An adjustable washer cutter typically used for cutting washers from gasket material.

    By Anonymous Anonymous, at 9/28/2004 9:54 PM  

  • 137 - Looks like the business end of a golf club.

    By Anonymous Anonymous, at 9/28/2004 9:56 PM  

  • 140. used to apply house current to something obviously round. Mabee some sort of tester for bulbs.

    By Blogger pa-ter, at 9/29/2004 6:20 AM  

  • >Rear sight for a military rifle.

    Yes, it's a gun sight.


    >136 - An adjustable washer cutter typically used for cutting washers from gasket material.

    Correct


    >137 - Looks like the business end of a golf club.

    Yes, it's the face of an old iron. Good job on this one, I was concerned it might be too difficult.

    >140. used to apply house current to something obviously round. Mabee some sort of tester for bulbs.

    Still researching this tool.

    By Blogger Rob, at 9/29/2004 3:25 PM  

  • #140 My hunch is it's a spark gap electrode for early radio transmission. I wish I knew what material it was made of.

    By Anonymous Anonymous, at 9/29/2004 11:29 PM  

  • 140 is a spark tester for small engines

    By Anonymous Anonymous, at 9/29/2004 11:51 PM  

  • #138 is a seam ripper and used to cut the threads that form a seam between pieces of cloth in a piece of clothing.

    #139 is a curo puzzle formed of 2 pieces of plate and a metal ball. Objective is to assemble/disassemble the puzzle into it's 3 parts.

    By Anonymous Anonymous, at 9/30/2004 10:12 AM  

  • #141 is the rear sight of an old military rifle designed prior to World War I. It is an open sight, as opposed to an aperture sight.

    It could be a Mosin-Nagant rear sight. The checkered portions are pressed inward to unlock it and allow the user to slide the aperture back and forth up and down the ramp to adjust for elevation, as was common on many rifle designs of that era. It doesn't look like a Mauser sight (it certainly isn't a German G98 "Lange" rear sight), though Mausers were manufactured in a dizzying variety of variations in many nations for decades. It doesn't look like a Lee-Enfield rear sight, though it might be. It isn't a 1903 Springfield sight.

    By Anonymous Anonymous, at 9/30/2004 2:31 PM  

  • Without doubt, a rear sight from an 8mm Mauser. Several variations, this one matches exactly the Turk 1938 in my closet.

    By Anonymous Anonymous, at 9/30/2004 4:36 PM  

  • #141 - Without doubt, a rear sight from an 8mm Mauser. Several variations, this one matches exactly the Turk 1938 in my closet.

    By Anonymous Anonymous, at 9/30/2004 4:38 PM  

  • >#140 My hunch is it's a spark gap electrode for early radio transmission. I wish I knew what material it was made of.


    I think that it's bakelite, but it's hard to say for sure.


    >140 is a spark tester for small engines

    I believe that this is the correct answer.


    >#138 is a seam ripper and used to cut the threads that form a seam between pieces of cloth in a piece of clothing.

    Sounds reasonable, I'll look into it.


    >#139 is a curo puzzle formed of 2 pieces of plate and a metal ball. Objective is to assemble/disassemble the puzzle into it's 3 parts.

    Correct



    >#141 is the rear sight of an old military rifle designed prior to World War I. It is an open sight, as opposed to an aperture sight.

    >It could be a Mosin-Nagant rear sight. The checkered portions are pressed inward to unlock it and allow the user to slide the aperture back and forth up and down the ramp to adjust for elevation, as was common on many rifle designs of that era. It doesn't look like a Mauser sight (it certainly isn't a German G98 "Lange" rear sight), though Mausers were manufactured in a dizzying variety of variations in many nations for decades. It doesn't look like a Lee-Enfield rear sight, though it might be. It isn't a 1903 Springfield sight.

    Thanks for the info.

    >Without doubt, a rear sight from an 8mm Mauser. Several variations, this one matches exactly the Turk 1938 in my closet.

    Thanks, I just did a search and found a photo of one on a rifle:

    http://www.gunpartsandmilitaria.com/TurkishM38.html

    By Blogger Rob, at 9/30/2004 5:25 PM  

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