What is it?

I've been collecting unusual objects for quite a while, and several years ago I started posting them on this site as puzzles for visitors to figure out what they are. Most of the items are mine but a few belong to others, if you aren't interested in tools there are plenty of other type objects that have also been posted.

For first time visitors I recommend this archive for a wide variety of some of my best pieces.

Thursday, January 24, 2008

Set 216

1203. 2-7/8" diameter:

Take a look at Neatorama for more guesses on this one.
















1204. 58" long, sent in by someone looking to identify it, this piece was found in a barn in Arkansas, the tall end can pivot at the joint and the short end is adjustable, it can slide along the notched part and lock into place:


















1205. Submitted by a visitor:


The owner's description of this device:
It is obviously a cutter or trimmer for something – but what?

It has two “pressure plates” that hold whatever is being cut in place. When clamped, these round plates rotate in either direction and can be locked on each quarter turn. You can’t see the lower plate as it’s immediately below the upper one you see in the picture. The spring-loaded thumb lever on the lower front inserts a pin into an indent in the lower plate to hold it in place – for trimming, I assume. There are only four indents to lock into – one every 90 degrees around the plate. The top plate is spring-loaded in the up position and is locked down by pushing down on the handle located between the springs.

The trimmer has a maximum cut of about 5”. If something flat and trimmable less than 5” (and more than 4”) in both directions is slid between the plates, clamped down, and trimmed on all four sides, it ends up being a perfect 4” square.

What is this thing meant to cut? And why does it have a walnut carrying case?

...I was hoping to find some manufacturer’s marks but there is absolutely no mark of any kind on the whatsit nor the case. The bulk of it is made of cast aluminum, I think.
...the plates are slightly notched like a fine file and would mar a photograph.



















1206. 3" long, made of nickel plated brass, another one sent in by a visitor:

Larger image















1207. 15" long:






















1208. The handle is 17-3/4" long:






































































To submit photos, click on the profile link at the upper right to find my email address.




























Answers
























Last week's set is seen below, click here to view the entire post:








More discussion and comments on these photos can be found at the newsgroup rec.puzzles.

Labels:

10 Comments:

  • 1207 is a FuBar, a hand-demolition tool.

    By Blogger Blaisepascal, at 1/24/2008 7:56 AM  

  • #1207 - Stanley 55-119 FatMax Functional Utility Bar "FUBar" -- general instrument of destruction

    Great tool for ripping up old flooring

    By Blogger Alex, at 1/24/2008 8:16 AM  

  • 1208: A winch, I think. It would be anchored by the ring at the top in the first picture, and the moving rope wraps around the drum between the ratchet and the handle.

    By Anonymous kpreid, at 1/24/2008 9:37 AM  

  • 1204 A ladder jack. Positioned on an extension ladder so the solid bar is horizontal to hold scaffold planks.

    By Anonymous Anonymous, at 1/24/2008 10:12 AM  

  • 1208 For stretching fence wire.

    By Anonymous Anonymous, at 1/24/2008 10:14 AM  

  • The Isis!

    By Anonymous Anonymous, at 1/24/2008 5:01 PM  

  • 1203 is the Isis

    By Anonymous Anonymous, at 1/24/2008 5:02 PM  

  • #1208 A winch of some kind for sure. But not a very powerful one.

    By Blogger John Nicholas, at 1/24/2008 9:29 PM  

  • #1206 is a spray nozzle of somekind. For spraying flocking or perhaps some sort of powdered material.

    By Blogger John Nicholas, at 1/24/2008 9:36 PM  

  • 1203:Humidor?
    1204:One of a pr of Ladder Jacks
    1205:Tile trimmer?
    1206:Nozzle of some sort
    1208:Early"load binder"for tightening rope.

    By Anonymous Yupper, at 1/25/2008 10:32 AM  

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