What is it?

I've been collecting unusual objects for quite a while, and several years ago I started posting them on this site as puzzles for visitors to figure out what they are. Most of the items are mine but a few belong to others, if you aren't interested in tools there are plenty of other type objects that have also been posted.

For first time visitors I recommend this archive for a wide variety of some of my best pieces.

Thursday, November 17, 2005

Welcome Metafilter readers, please stop back tomorrow to see a new set of photos.


508. 3-3/4" long









509. 41" tall






510. A canvas bag mounted on wood:








16" long at the base, made in 1946







511. 8" long





512. Partial/close-up shot:








513. Someone submitted this tool looking to find out exactly what it is, patented in 1897:




514. 20" long







Answers

12 Comments:

  • 510. Seed spreader
    512. toaster

    By Blogger pa-ter, at 11/17/2005 6:20 AM  

  • 511. Jar opener?

    By Anonymous Aquinas, at 11/17/2005 8:20 AM  

  • 514 - Is this a tool for holding planer blades while they are being sharpened?

    By Blogger Roscoe, at 11/17/2005 10:57 AM  

  • 508 - A staple remover?

    By Blogger Roscoe, at 11/17/2005 10:59 AM  

  • 509 A leather worker's bench

    By Anonymous Anonymous, at 11/17/2005 11:35 AM  

  • 509 - Harness maker's bench.

    513 - Looks like a mechanical stage for a microscope. The brass knobs would be used to move the specimen (mounted in the C-shaped portion of the stage) in the x- and y-planes, with the vernier markings on the right side and bottom used to determine coordinates to help re-locate areas of the specimen. The manufacturer (B&L) marked on the device produces microscopes. The only thing that I am uncertain about is what type of specimen the C-shaped area would hold -- it doesn't look like it was designed for conventional rectangular microscope slides. Maybe it was used to hold a small dish that contained live specimens. If this guess is correct, it was a stage for a "dissecting" microscope (reflected light microscope), used to examine surfaces, rather than the more commonly known type of microscope used to examine internal structures (transmitted light microscope).

    By Anonymous Anonymous, at 11/17/2005 7:57 PM  

  • #510: Seed spreader/planter
    #512: The inside of onside of an electric bread toaster.

    By Anonymous kristi, at 11/17/2005 8:46 PM  

  • 513. The previous poster is correct. Thanks to the (just barely legible :-) patent date in the photograph, I was able to eventually track down the item to US Patent No. 588,689.

    Here is a link to the patent document (with diagrams).

    By Anonymous Sawdust, at 11/17/2005 11:50 PM  

  • 508. This punches paper, cutting on one side of the shape, then folds the punched part back to form a paper "staple".

    By Blogger Canem, at 11/18/2005 7:53 AM  

  • 513. Thanks to Sawdust's great detecive work, I was able to review quite a number of B&L's patents. Here is a link to their innovations from a site that should be of interest to all of us tool fanatics.

    www.americanartifacts.com/smma/micro/bausch.htm

    Oh, and the 'C' part appears to be the fixed point of the mount, designed to securly hold onto a pipe.

    - Edward

    By Anonymous Anonymous, at 11/18/2005 10:10 AM  

  • >510. Seed spreader
    >512. toaster

    >511. Jar opener?

    All correct


    >514 - Is this a tool for holding planer blades while they are being sharpened?

    Nope

    >508 - A staple remover?

    Yes

    >509 A leather worker's bench

    Correct

    >509 - Harness maker's bench.

    More correct

    >513 - Looks like a mechanical stage for a microscope...

    Thanks for the info.

    >#510: Seed spreader/planter
    >#512: The inside of onside of an electric bread toaster.

    Both correct

    >513. ...I was able to eventually track down the item to US Patent No. 588,689.

    Thanks




    >508. This punches paper...

    Nope, it's too weak for that


    >513. ...Here is a link to their innovations from a site that should be of interest to all of us tool fanatics.

    That's a good link, thanks.

    By Blogger Rob, at 11/18/2005 4:30 PM  

  • 516. Contact lens holder/s.

    By Anonymous Marcel, at 11/24/2005 8:47 AM  

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