What is it?

I've been collecting unusual objects for quite a while, and several years ago I started posting them on this site as puzzles for visitors to figure out what they are. Most of the items are mine but a few belong to others, if you aren't interested in tools there are plenty of other type objects that have also been posted.

For first time visitors I recommend this archive for a wide variety of some of my best pieces.

Thursday, April 05, 2007

Set 164



946. Approximately 11" long, this tool is over 160 years old:




















947. 6-1/2" long, more guesses on this one can be seen on Neatorama:


The bottom is hollow.












948. 8-3/4" long:














949. 2" long:












950. 5" wide:












951. 48" long:































Answers

























Last week's set is seen below, click here to view the entire post:








More discussion and comments on these photos can be found at the newsgroup rec.puzzles.



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5 Comments:

  • 946. Is a handplane with an adjustable width "plow". My guess is that it is used for making ornamental concave cuts near the edges of objects that have flat or round side surfaces. The purpose of the bow-like plow part is that it can "lead" the cutting edge along a flat or a curved surface.

    By Anonymous Mordred, at 4/05/2007 8:02 AM  

  • 951. planetarium projector.
    946. I agree with mordred...perhaps for musical instrument binding.

    By Anonymous Anonymous, at 4/05/2007 9:13 AM  

  • 946 is definitely a grooving handplane, with an adjustable sole for following a straight or curved surface. It's also an incredible example of the planemaker's art- thanks for showing it to us! I'm betting that it has a huge value on the collector's market, too.

    www.realrecycling.blogspot.com

    By Blogger Steve, at 4/05/2007 6:21 PM  

  • 949 A medical device known as a spring loaded fleem. Used for blood letting.

    By Anonymous Anonymous, at 4/05/2007 8:01 PM  

  • 948. Is a nail-holding hammer, a nail is put in the holding shaft within the spring. When the hammer is striked, most of the nail is within the shaft, thus protected from bending.

    950. Looks like a boot cap.

    By Anonymous Mordred, at 4/06/2007 8:09 AM  

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